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New US Census Report Could Show Growth of Minorities

The demographic makeup of the United States is changing rapidly, with a new report Thursday on the 2020 census expected to show that minorities accounted for all of America’s population growth in the last decade, and that for the first time the number of whites in the country has declined.
 
The Census Bureau in April said the once-every-10-years population count showed the U.S. had 331.4 million residents in 2020 and grew by just 7.4% since 2010. It was the slowest growth in any decade except during the Great Depression in the 1930s since the census was first started in 1790.
 
Although exact figures will not be known until the Census Bureau releases its demographic breakdown from last year’s count, early estimates are that 59.8% of the country’s population is now white, the first time that figure would fall below 60%, with 18.6% Hispanic, 12.5% Black and 9.1% Asian and other racial minorities.
 
In another first, a majority of the under-18 population could be non-white, presaging further demographic changes toward a bigger population of minorities in the decades to come.
 
Some demographers say whites could still be the largest single group in 2045, but will likely be outnumbered by a mix of other racial groups, including Latinos, Blacks, Asian Americans and others.
 
Half or more of the population growth among U.S. minorities in the last decade came from Hispanics, who have doubled their share of the country’s population over the last three decades.  
 
The new census data will play an important role in U.S. politics as state lawmakers across much of the country and politically independent commissions in some states use the information to redraw the geographic lines for congressional and state legislative districts that in most cases will likely be used in elections through 2030.  
 
Both Republicans and Democrats, where they control state legislatures, have often tried to draw the lines to their advantage, crowding as many of their opponents’ likely voters as they can into a handful of districts in hopes of winning more seats in the 435-member U.S. House of Representatives and the 50 state legislatures.
 
A small number of states, however, have adopted the use of independent commissions to redraw their legislative districts, hoping to make the once-a-decade process less political and fairer to both political parties.  
 
In any case, the redrawing of districts each decade spawns numerous lawsuits from both parties alleging that the other has unfairly skewed the process in their favor, leaving it to judges to make final determinations of the exact geographic lines.
 
In November 2022, political control of Congress is at stake, with all 435 House seats up for election and Republicans needing only to pick up five seats to win control from the Democrats.
 
A third of the seats in the Senate, now divided evenly with 50 Republicans and 50 Democrats, are also up for grabs, but the census has no bearing on the voting since each state is represented by two senators, regardless of population.  
 
In the House, demographic shifts in the U.S. will impact the number of House seats in 13 states, with Republican-controlled Texas gaining two seats, another five states each gaining another congressman and seven states losing one each.  
 
The bigger population growth in southern states, where congressional representation is growing, would seem to favor Republicans, while lesser growth in northern states could mostly hurt Democratic election chances in upcoming years.
 

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Reporter’s Notebook: Families Fleeing Afghanistan Struggle to Survive in Turkey

Afghan clothes and Iranian SIM cards litter fields under the mountains that stand between Turkey and the Iranian border. A wisp of smoke rises out of what was a small fire, abandoned many hours before.  As the Taliban swept through villages and cities in Afghanistan over the past few months, families have fled in droves, many traveling across Iran and into Turkey.  In the past, this route was flooded with refugees trying to get to Europe to seek safety and freedom. Now it’s packed with people making a last-ditch effort to stay alive in Turkey, where they find no humanitarian aid and run the risk of being arrested and deported. Abdul Tawab, 16, fled Afghanistan after his uncle, a lawyer in a government court, was killed by the Taliban, Aug. 11, 2021, in Van, Turkey. (Claire Thomas/VOA)We meet 16-year-old Abdul Tawab outside the park where he sleeps in central Van, a city famous among tourists for its massive lake and among refugees for its proximity to the Iranian border.  Tawab arrived in Turkey two weeks ago, hoping to go to Istanbul to find a job. But like so many other men and boys in the park, he is now out of money and stuck here in Van. Tawab says he is afraid he will be arrested if he draws attention to himself outside, so we walk a zigzag path through the markets until he feels safe at a table upstairs in a café.  In Afghanistan, Tawab supported five siblings and his parents on his carpenter’s salary, which was about $1 a day. He left home after the Taliban had stormed into his village and riddled his uncle with bullets, killing the well-loved father of nine. “He didn’t care if people were rich or poor,” Tawab says. “He liked everyone, and everyone liked him.” Taliban fighters on motorcycles later wrapped his uncle’s body in barbed wire and deposited it in a field, Tawab says. Refugees say the militants will execute anyone who is associated with the Afghanistan government or foreign organizations, or anyone identified as Hazara, a Shiite ethnic group and the country’s largest religious minority. Saranwal Nadir, Tawab’s uncle, was a lawyer in a government court. “We found him in the field,” Tawab says. “His body was lying in puddles of water and blood.”  Crisis beginning Turkey already hosts 3.7 million refugees, more than any other country in the world. But frustration among the population is growing, and many believe this crisis is only beginning.  Garments traditional in Afghanistan and Pakistan are found in an area where refugees hide out in when they first enter Turkey, Aug. 11, 2021, in Van, Turkey. (Claire Thomas/VOA)Twitter in Turkey is alight with rumors about incoming people from Afghanistan. Some say the refugees are increasing crime rates or depressing wages. Another commonly heard complaint is that they are mostly young men, as evidenced by videos online. Young men from Afghanistan say the women and children are mostly in safe houses, hidden from cameras by the same smugglers who kicked the men out onto the streets, sometimes to be rounded up and deported. When the United States fully pulls out of Afghanistan, the borders may be even more packed with people trying to get into Turkey, a relatively safe country that has a history of taking in refugees, says Mahmut Kaçan, a lawyer and the coordinator for the Asylum and Migration Commission of the Van Bar Association.  But once in Turkey, there is no clear path to establishing legal status and no organizations at all to support families in need of food or shelter. The United Nations’ refugee agency no longer processes asylum claims in Turkey, and claims through government offices can take years.  “They are living in limbo in Turkey,” Kaçan says.  Taliban takeover Up at least four flights of sloping concrete stairs, in a two-bedroom apartment in Van, two families from Afghanistan, 12 people in all, say they are afraid to go outside. Inside, the apartment is barren, with almost no furniture and only a few plastic bags of clothes and bedding.  Two families, 12 people total, live in this unfurnished apartment in Van, Turkey, after fleeing Afghanistan, Aug. 10, 2021. (Claire Thomas/VOA)The adults go out only when they think they may find work. But after a month in Turkey, none of them have had any luck. The rent here is less than $70 a month, and the families say they already sold all their belongings to pay smugglers $1,000 per person, roughly the minimum cost to get from Kabul to Van. They borrowed rent money last month and do not know how they will manage in the future.  But as soon as the U.S. announced it would be pulling out, says Saeed Sanaye Sadet, one of the apartment residents, he knew he would never be safe at home again, because he used to work for an American company. We point out that the Taliban have taken over vast swaths of Afghanistan in recent months, but not all of it, and the capital, Kabul, is still held by the government. But Sadet says the fall of the country feels inevitable.  “It’s already happening,” he scoffs, when we ask why he is so sure. Women and girls On the edge of a graveyard in Van, rows of shallow graves cover the bodies of people who died attempting to flee to Turkey.  Many were among the 61 refugees killed in a shipwreck on Lake Van last year. Other graves are identified only by the border-area location where the body was found.  As we drive away from the graveyard, Mohammad Mahdi Sultani, a journalist from Afghanistan who is working with us as a guide and translator, says people have been risking their lives for a long time to escape Afghanistan, which has been at war since the 2001 U.S. invasion.  But the reason people are fleeing is shifting as the Taliban gain ground, he says. His uncle fled his village for Iran because he has two daughters, 19 and 21. When the Taliban came in, they demanded that families place flags outside their houses to indicate whether there were any unwed women or girls inside. Leena Sadet, pictured Aug. 10, 2021, in Van, Turkey, had been a language teacher in Afghanistan before the Taliban took over her area, prompting her to flee the country. (Claire Thomas/VOA)”They say (the Taliban) will marry them,” Sultani says, meaning, by force.  In the crowded apartment up the stairs, Leena Sadet, Saeed Sadet’s wife, says she remembers her mom’s blue burqa from her childhood, when Taliban law forced all women to leave their jobs and go outside only fully covered.  “The same thing will happen if they are in power,” Leena Sadet says. “The women won’t work, and the girls will not go to school.” Mohammad Mahdi Sultani contributed to this report.

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США відреагували на вимогу Мінська про скорочення штату американського посольства

США, Велика Британія та Канада оголосили про нові торгові та фінансові санкції щодо Білорусі 9 серпня

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ВООЗ повідомила про тестування трьох препаратів для лікування тяжких випадків COVID-19

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Співачка Alyona Alyona повідомила про повістку на допит після дрифту на Софійській площі

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Belarus Tells US to Reduce Embassy Staff, Rejects Ambassador

The regime of authoritarian Belarusian leader Alexander Lukashenko has responded to the latest round of U.S. sanctions by requesting Washington to reduce its embassy staff in Minsk to five people by September 1. Belarusian Foreign Ministry’s spokesman Anatol Hlaz said in an interview that was placed on the ministry’s website on August 11 that Minsk also had revoked its consent to the appointment of Julie Fisher as the U.S. ambassador to Belarus. “Taking into account that Belarus has lost trust in the current U.S. administration, we suspend cooperation in all new projects, grants, and programs coordinated by the U.S. government until such trust is back,” Hlaz said, adding that Minsk reserved the right to introduce additional measures in the future. FILE – Julie Fisher, U.S. ambassador-designate to Belarus, testifies before a Senate Foreign Relations Committee hearing on Capitol Hill in Washington, June 9, 2021.Fisher, the first U.S. ambassador to Belarus since 2008, was confirmed by the Senate in December 2020 but has been unable to take up her post in Minsk because the Belarusian government has denied her a visa. Hlaz’s interview appeared after the United States, Britain and Canada announced new trade and financial sanctions on Belarus on August 9, the first anniversary of the presidential election that extended Lukashenka’s decades-long rule and sparked an unprecedented wave of protests amid allegations the vote was rigged. Lukashenko, in power since 1994, reacted to the protests by unleashing a brutal crackdown. More than 32,000 people have been detained, thousands beaten by police on the streets and in detention, with torture alleged in many cases. Opposition leaders have been locked up or forced to flee. In response, the United States, European Union, Canada, Britain and other countries have hit Lukashenko, his inner circle, and Belarusian firms with several rounds of sanctions, leaving Belarus’s strongman internationally isolated, dependent more than ever on Russian support. 
 

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Затверджено cтратегію комунікації з питань інтеграції до НАТО – ОПУ

Президент також доручив уряду у тримісячний строк розробити та затвердити план заходів щодо втілення затвердженої стратегії, зазначили в ОПУ

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У штабі ООС повідомили про 5 порушень тиші на Донбасі, поранено військового

Внаслідок обстрілів один військовий отримав вогнепальні осколкові поранення, його госпіталізовано у задовільному стані