Daily Archives

23 Articles

your ad here
Posted by Worldkrap on

Russia Extends Ukraine Sailors’ Detention Amid Prisoner Swap Talks

A Russian court on Wednesday prolonged the detention of 24 Ukrainian sailors captured last year near Crimea, in the midst of sensitive prisoner-swap talks between the two ex-Soviet neighbors.Moscow’s Lefortovsky district court ruled that the sailors must stay in detention for an extra three months until Oct. 24. After the hearings, the sailors were escorted out of the courtroom by masked security officers as relatives and supporters applauded. Some wiped away tears.Relatives sported yellow bracelets bearing the names of the sailors, who face up to six years in prison on charges of illegally crossing Russian borders.In the cramped courtroom, the sailors, who have described themselves as “prisoners of war”, were held in a metal-barred cage reserved for defendants. Olena Zerkal, Ukrainian deputy foreign minister, condemned the extension of the sailors’ detention, saying it only complicated “diplomats’ complicated work” amid the current negotiations.The Ukrainians have been imprisoned since their three vessels were seized off Crimea last November, the most dangerous direct clash between Russia and Ukraine in years.This combination of photos created on July 11, 2019, shows Russian President Vladimir Putin, left, and Ukraine President Volodymyr Zelensky.Russian President Vladimir Putin and Ukraine’s new leader Volodymyr Zelensky discussed a possible prisoner swap during their first phone call last week.Zelensky said Wednesday that an exchange of all Ukrainian prisoners held in Russia and also areas held by pro-Russian separatists  for all Russian prisoners held in Ukraine  would happen, “starting with the sailors.”In Kyiv on Tuesday, Vadym Prystaiko, a senior presidential official, had said that Ukraine and Russia had agreed to exchange a certain number of prisoners over the next month. Putin’s spokesman Dmitry Peskov said earlier Wednesday that the prisoner swap was “on the agenda.”‘Keep hoping'”I am ready to wait for as long as needed as long as this ends well,” Natalya Mokryak, mother of the commander of one of the detained vessels, Roman Mokryak, said in court.”They haven’t done anything wrong,” added Iryna Guzhanska, whose husband Yury Budzylo is also among the prisoners.”We keep hoping,” she told AFP before the hearing began. Lawyer Nikolai Polozov, who heads the defense team, and Ukraine’s rights ombudsman Lyudmyla Denysova, who attended the hearing, said Russia and Ukraine were negotiating a possible prisoner exchange. They declined to discuss any details.Speaking ahead of the hearing, Polozov said Russia would likely extend the sailors’ detention “as a maneuver to exercise control.”On Tuesday, Denysova and her Russian counterpart Tatyana Moskalkova exchanged lists of prisoners. Kyiv’s list consists of “150 cases,” Denysova has said. Among the most prominent Ukrainian prisoners held in Russia is Oleg Sentsov, who is a serving a 20-year sentence in a Russian penal colony in the north.Last year, he went on a hunger strike and went 145 days without solid food.’Lack of political will’He suggested that Moscow may release the sailors at some point after Sunday’s parliamentary elections in Ukraine.”I am hoping that the sailors could be released before the trial starts,” Polozov told reporters.”The only thing that separates the sailors from their freedom is a lack of political will of the Russian leadership.”But the defense team also did not rule out that the sailors would have to be tried first before they could be exchanged.Lawyer Ilya Novikov told AFP that the trial could start in September and last until November. He said it could be held in Russia-annexed Crimea, a move that would complicate access to the hearings for diplomats and journalists.He suggested that the prisoner-swap negotiations might be failing to gain traction.”No one wants to make the first move,” he said.U.S. Special Representative for Ukraine Negotiations Kurt Volker, third from left, meets with Ukrainian troops at an undisclosed location near Popasna, Donbas region, Ukraine, May 15, 2018. (M. Gongadze/VOA)On Tuesday, U.S. special envoy to Ukraine, Kurt Volker, encouraged Russia to agree to a prisoner exchange with Kyiv.”If successful, it will be the result of direct engagement between Presidents Zelensky and Putin,” he tweeted.In November, Russia opened fire on three Ukrainian navy vessels as they tried to pass through the Kerch Strait from the Black Sea to the Sea of Azov.The two countries have been locked in a confrontation since 2014 when Moscow annexed Crimea and supported an insurgency in eastern Ukraine. More than 10,000 people have been killed in the conflict. 

your ad here
Posted by Ukrap on

Одна дитина загинула через зсув піску на Рівненщині – ДСНС

Одна дитина загинула через зсув піску поблизу Ясногірки на Рівненщині, повідомила Державна служба України з надзвичайних ситуацій.

У відомстві розповіли, що інцидент стався на території піщаного кар’єру. Хлопчика 2009 року народження дістали місцеві жителі, його шпиталізували.

Тіло другої дитини знайшли через кілька годин.

your ad here
Posted by Ukrap on

Клуб українця Реброва вийшов до наступного раунду кваліфікації Ліги чемпіонів

Угорський «Ференцварош» під керівництвом українця Сергія Реброва вийшов до другого раунду кваліфікації Ліги чемпіонів.

Чемпіони Угорщини 17 липня здолали на виїзді болгарський «Лудогорець» – 2:3. Один із голів за «Ференцварош» забив українець Ігор Харатін. Перший матч між командами закінчився з рахунком 2:1 на користь угорців.

У другому раунді кваліфікації «Ференцварош» зустрінеться з мальтійською «Валлеттою».

Ребров став головним тренером «Ференцвароша» у 2018 році. У свій перший сезон в Угорщині він здобув титул чемпіона країни.

your ad here
Posted by Worldkrap on

After Record Heat Wave, Parts of Europe Now Face Drought 

After weathering record-breaking temperatures, parts of Europe are now gripped by a punishing drought that is shriveling harvests, sparking water shortages and taking a toll on wildlife. experts now warn Europeans must better prepare for today’s ‘new normal.’Weeks of dry weather have left two-thirds of French departments facing water restrictions. Plants and wildlife are stressed. More than 20 departments are in the critical red category that restricts water use to only essential needs.France is not the only European country facing a parched summer. This weather forecast in neighboring Spain indicates some rain up north, but overall the country is baking in its third driest year this century.Dry weather also has hit parts of Germany, Poland, the Czech Republic and Scandinavian countries. This month, Lithuania declared an emergency, with drought expected to cut its harvests by half.All of this follows a string of record-breaking temperatures in June across much of the continent.People cool off by the Vistula River during a heatwave in Warsaw, Poland, June 30, 2019.Climate change and adaptation expert Blaz Kurnik, of the European Environment Agency in Copenhagen, says that’s no coincidence.“Drought and heatwaves are connected,” he said. “And they are amplifying each other afterwards.”Kurnik says its hard to just blame everything on climate change. But the last couple of years were the warmest ever recorded in Europe, mirroring the global temperature rise. And this is Europe’s second drought in as many years.Not surprisingly, farmers are worried. We’re going to irrigate some plots, this farmer told French TV, while noting that not all of the crops can be saved.Insurance companies estimate last year’s drought cost Europe several billion dollars. Expert Kurnik points up that’s only part of the bill.“There are also losses, which cannot directly translate into money, which are the permanent damage of the forest, the loss of biodiversity … which can recover in the next years — or not,” he said.Europe has long been considered a climate change leader. Experts say many European Union countries have drafted comprehensive plans to mitigate the impact of hotter and drier weather in the years to come. But that’s not enough.When it comes to sustainable water management, for instance, environmental group WWF’s European Water Policy Officer Carla Freund says there’s a disconnect between good legislation and action.“I think we see a lack of will overall,” she said. “It’s not an area of priority for a lot of member states. I think water is seen as something that’s ubiquitous regardless. So I don’t think governments are really aware that we’re going to be facing a huge shortage problem in the future.”A different EuropeA Swiss study out earlier this month predicts that like other parts of the world, Europe will be drastically different by 2050. London’s climate may be more like Barcelona’s today. Madrid will be more like Marakesh.Climate change expert Kurnik says that in some ways, Europe is preparing for these changes. France’s 2003 heatwave killed 15,000 people. That didn’t happen this year. Some farmers are planting drought-resistant crops and adopting more efficient irrigation methods. But he says the efforts are patchy.Meanwhile, next week’s forecast predicts yet another heatwave in France — with no rain in sight.

your ad here
Posted by Worldkrap on

US Cuts Turkey Out of F-35 Fighter Jet Program 

The United States is officially removing Turkey from its F-35 stealth fighter jet program after Ankara accepted the Russian delivery of its S-400 missile defense system.”Unfortunately, Turkey’s decision to purchase Russian S-400 air defense systems renders its continued involvement with the F-35 impossible,” the White House said in a statement Wednesday. “The F-35 cannot coexist with a Russian intelligence collection platform that will be used to learn about its advanced capabilities.”U.S. officials believe NATO ally Turkey’s decision to use Russian advanced radar technology could compromise the alliance’s military systems in the country. The S-400 could potentially be used to target NATO jets in Turkey, including the U.S.-made F-35, which is NATO’s newest stealth fighter jet.Defense Secretary nominee Mark Esper testifies before a Senate Armed Services Committee hearing on his nomination in Washington, July 16, 2019.On Tuesday, President Donald Trump’s nominee to be the next secretary of defense slammed Turkey’s acceptance of the S-400, parts of which were delivered last week, as “wrong” and “disappointing.” Mark Esper told lawmakers he emphasized in a phone call to Turkey’s Defense Minister Hulusi Akar that “you can either have the S-400 or the F-35. You can’t have both.”A Russian transport jet delivered the first parts of the $2.2 billion missile system last Friday to a Turkish military air base outside Ankara.Turkey’s Ministry of National Defense has said its purchase of the S-400 defense systems was “not an option but rather a necessity.”The ministry said last week that Turkey was still assessing the bid to acquire U.S. Patriot air defense systems.But the White House countered Turkey’s assertion on Wednesday.”The United States has been actively working with Turkey to provide air defense solutions to meet its legitimate air defense needs, and this administration has made multiple offers to move Turkey to the front of the line to receive the U.S. PATRIOT air defense system,” the White House said.The White House added that Turkey has been a “longstanding and trusted partner and NATO Ally for over 65 years,” but that “accepting the S-400 undermines the commitments all NATO Allies made to each other to move away from Russian systems.”Potentially more damaging for Turkey are U.S. sanctions under the Countering America’s Adversaries through Sanctions Act (CAATSA), which could hit Turkey’s already weakened economy.The top Republican and Democratic senators of the Senate Armed Services Committee and Senate Foreign Relations Committee, Jim Inhofe, Jack Reed, Jim Risch and Bob Menendez, issued a joint statement Friday condemning the delivery and urging President Trump to fully implement the sanctions.Turkey’s President Recep Tayyip Erdogan waves to supporters following a rally to honor the victims of the July 15, 2016 failed coup attempt, part of the ceremonies marking the three-year anniversary, in Istanbul, July 15, 2019.”By accepting delivery of the S-400 from Russia, President [Recep Tayyip] Erdogan has chosen a perilous partnership with Putin at the expense of Turkey’s security, economic prosperity and the integrity of the NATO alliance,” the senators said.”It did not have to come to this,” they added, stating that Turkey had “rejected multiple attempts” by the United States to preserve the relationship while protecting Turkish airspace with F-35 fighter jets and the U.S.-made Patriot surface-to-air defense system.Turkish officials argue Turkey is in a complicated geopolitical region, as it borders Iran, Iraq, and Syria. Three years ago, the Turkish presidential palace was bombed by rogue elements of its military in an attempted coup, and some analysts suggest the missiles could be used to protect Turkish President Erdogan.While the S-400 is widely recognized as one of the most advanced missile systems in the world, its practical use is in question, given its incompatibility with the rest of Turkey’s NATO military systems.From a military perspective there is no logic,” said retired General Haldun Solmazturk, who now heads the Ankara-based 21st Century Institute research institution. “This is not only a problem between Turkey and the United States, but it is a problem between Turkey and the rest of the 28 NATO members, so it’s a serious problem.”

your ad here
Posted by Ukrap on

Зеленський: Путін запропонував обмін «усіх на всіх»

За даними МЗС, Росія незаконно утримує понад 70 українців. До цього числа не входять 24 моряки, захоплені Росією біля Керченської проток

your ad here
Posted by Worldkrap on

A Breathless Ocean

The ocean provides many benefits to our planet and all the creatures that live there. It regulates the earth’s climate, produces 60 percent of the oxygen for the earth and is an important source of food.   Denise Breitburg is a marine ecologist with the Smithsonian Environmental Research Center. Her research and studies center on the Chesapeake Bay and its tributaries, a large water system that stretches from New York to Virginia. The Bay itself receives about half its volume from the Atlantic Ocean. “I do work on a wide range of organisms, from fish, jellyfish to oysters. Any of the things large enough to see without a microscope. But, I’m also really interested not just in individual animals, but in how it all fits together, how food webs change, how the environment influences evolution and really the ecosystems as a whole.” Breitburg says one thing that has a negative impact on the ecosystem is oxygen decline in the ocean.   “Animals need oxygen to breathe, grow, reproduce and survive. The marine ecosystems require oxygen. But, oxygen is declining in the open ocean and coastal waters because of increasing global temperatures and excess nutrients.”Marine ecologist Denise BreitburgFinding a solution to this problem, Breitburg says, requires spending much of her time doing research and instead of being in the open waters. She also spends time speaking to policy makers and environmental managers to educate them on the issues so they can develop policies that are going to be effective. Breitburg says ocean deoxygenation does not occur in isolation or only in waters in the United States. “I’ve been co-chairing a working group that’s part of the Intergovernmental Oceanographic Commission from UNESCO. It  includes about 20 researchers and scientists from around the world, who all work on various aspects of the problem of low oxygen in the oceans. Waters are warming and acidifying, food webs are changed by fishing and habitat can be degraded by plastics and other pollutants.” This is a problem around the world, says Breitburg. “Everything from fisheries to global models to trying to understand the effects of climate change. Many many places around the world have the same sort of problems that we have here.” Breitburg says the Clean Air Act and other kinds of management of coastal waters has reduced the amount of nitrogen coming into the Chesapeake Bay. In other words, policies, regulations, and research can make a difference over time, Breitburg says. “The Earth’s population has increased. It’s almost tripled since 1950, and things that we used to be able to do when there were many fewer of us just don’t work in a global population this size, and at a time when we still need to think about how to bring people from poorer developing countries up to a better standard of living so that they’re healthy and can lead long lives. And for that to happen, that means each of us having less of an impact on this earth and supporting government actions that will encourage that to happen. So, we can hopefully leave a healthier environment for our children and grandchildren.”     

your ad here
Posted by Worldkrap on

US House Holding Trump Impeachment Vote

The U.S. House of Representatives is voting Wednesday on whether to immediately consider impeaching President Donald Trump. It’s a proposition likely to fail, although the vote could show where the Democratic-controlled chamber stands on attempting to begin the process of removing the Republican from office.The impeachment vote is being forced by Congressman Al Green, a Democrat from the southwestern state of Texas, against the wishes of House Speaker Nancy Pelosi. She and other House leaders instead have supported numerous legislative investigations of Trump’s 2016 campaign links to Russia, his finances and taxes, and whether, as president, he obstructed justice by trying to thwart special counsel Robert Mueller’s investigation of the election.Green has previously used the legislative rules in the House to force two impeachment votes, in December 2017 and a month later, with the then-Republican-controlled House overwhelmingly voting both times against his efforts. But the new vote is the first time Green has pressed the issue since Democrats took control of the chamber in January.House Speaker Nancy Pelosi, D-Calif., arrives for a closed-door session with her caucus before a vote on a resolution condemning what she called “racist comments” by President Donald Trump at the Capitol in Washington, July 16, 2019.Pelosi has blocked the start of a House impeachment inquiry in favor of the ongoing investigations. She has voiced fears of the political fallout for Democrats pursuing an impeachment effort when, even if the House did vote to impeach Trump, the Republican-controlled Senate is highly unlikely to convict Trump of wrongdoing by the required two-thirds vote to remove him from office.Pelosi was non-committal Tuesday about how it would handle Green’s demand for the impeachment vote.”That will be up to our leadership team to decide,” she said.House Majority Leader Steny Hoyer said, “We haven’t really discussed how to dispose of it. I’m not going try to discourage him, you know, he has to do what he thinks is right.”FILE – Robert Mueller, then-special counsel probing Russian interference in the 2016 election, departs Capitol Hill following a meeting with lawmakers, in Washington, June 21, 2017.Mueller is set to testify before two House investigative committees for hours next week about his 22-month probe.He concluded that Trump and his campaign did not conspire with Russia, while laying out several instances in which Trump possibly obstructed justice, the basis for about 80 of the 235 Democrats in the House, and one Republican-turned-independent lawmaker, to call for Trump’s impeachment or at least the start of an impeachment inquiry. Roughly two-thirds of the Democratic majority has not weighed in on Trump’s possible impeachment or voiced support for the current legislative investigations.Mueller reached no conclusion on whether Trump should be charged with obstruction, in part because of a long-standing Justice Department policy that sitting U.S. presidents cannot be criminally charged. Subsequently, Attorney General William Barr and then Deputy Attorney General Rod Rosenstein decided no charges were warranted against Trump. The president  has often claimed exoneration.Green omitted references to Trump’s alleged obstruction of Mueller’s investigation in his impeachment resolution, instead citing Trump’s incendiary comments this week telling four progressive lawmakers, all women of color, to “go back” to their homelands and other racially-provocative comments Trump has made during his presidency. The House condemned Trump’s remarks about the four congresswomen as racist.Green said he believes that if the House does not impeach Trump, it “will only intensify his ugly behavior. It just seemed to me that we should bring these articles before the House of Representatives so that we could not only condemn him, but impeach him so that he will understand that there are some boundaries.”